Analysing content and patterns of interaction for improving the learning design of networked learning environments

Pablo A. Haya, Oliver Daems, Nils Malzahn, Jorge Castellanos and Heinz Ulrich Hoppe

British Journal of Educational Technology. Article first published online: 3 MAR 2015 (2015) DOI: 10.1111/bjet.12264 [download] (JCR, IF 2014: 1.394, Q1)

Learning Analytics constitutes a key tool for supporting Learning Design and teacher-led inquiry into student learning. In this paper, we demonstrate how a Social Learning Analytics toolkit can combine social network analysis and content analysis for supporting a global and formal teacher inquiry. This toolkit not only supports teachers in improving the organisation of the learning process but also generates important input to improve the students’ reflection on their own learning. Our examples show how combinations of different levels of analysis can provide deep insight in the learning process. We report a case study that exemplifies the main features of our approach and the kind of outcomes that can be obtained. Commenting and rating processes on videos are analysed based on user traces from a social learning platform. Finally, we point out implications on the learning design for networked learning environments in general.

Discussion network

Big Data para la gestión de recursos humanos

David Aguado, Pablo A. Haya, Alvaro Barbero

Observatorio de Recursos Humanos 98 (2015) [download]

Big Data para la gestión de recursos humanos

Los gestores de RR.HH. han declarado explícitamente su interés por el Big Data. A pesar de ello, a día de hoy, no es fácil encontrar en nuestro país proyectos de Big Data ejecutados en el negocio de la gestión de Recursos Humanos. Este artículo pretende ayudar al gestor de RR.HH. a entender qué es el Big Data y cómo puede ponerlo al servicio de su negocio, ofreciéndole una visión específica de cómo se define y cuáles son sus características principales, las aplicaciones desarrolladas hasta la fecha en este sector y las dificultades y retos principales a la hora de implantar modelos Big Data en la gestión de Recursos Humanos.

Inferring ECA-based rules for ambient intelligence using evolutionary feature extraction

Leila S. Shafti, Pablo A. Haya, Manuel García-Herranz, Eduardo Pérez

Journal of Ambient Intelligence and Smart Environments 5 (6), 563-587 (2013) [download] (JCR, IF 2012: 1.298, Q2)

One of the goals in Ambient Intelligence is to enable Intelligent Environments to take decisions based on the perceived context. In our previous work, we successfully explored how the inhabitants can communicate their own preferences with the environment using Event-Condition-Action (ECA) rules. The easiness of the communication language combined with an appropriate explanation mechanism gives trust to the Intelligent Environment actions. However, defining every preference, and maintaining them up-to-date can be cumbersome. Therefore, a complementary mechanism is required to learn from user behavior and adapt to small changes without being explicitly requested for. Inferring behaviors effectively from data collected from sensors in an Intelligent Environment is a challenging problem. The main issues include primitive representation of data, the necessity of a high number of sensors, and dealing with few training data collected in a short time. We present MFE3/GADR, an evolutionary constructive induction method to ease inferring inhabitants’ preferences from data collected from simple sensors. We show that this method detects successfully relevant sensors and constructs highly informative features that abstract relations among them. The constructed features, in addition to improving significantly the learning accuracy, break down and encapsulate the performance of inhabitants into decision trees that can easily be converted to ECA rules for further use in the Intelligent Environment. Comparing the empirical results show that our method can reduce a large set of complex ECA rules that represent the preferences to a smaller set of simple ECA rules.

Designing videogames to improve students’ motivation

P. Molins-Ruano, C. Sevilla, S. Santini, P.A. Haya, P. Rodríguez, G.M. Sacha

Computers in Human Behavior 31 (2014) 571–579 [download] (JCR, IF 2012: 2.694, Q1 21/129 Psychology, multidisciplinary)

The use of new technical tools as a mean to increase the motivation and improve the education of students is an intriguing and pressing issue. Specifically, great interest has been shown in the use of videogames since they constitute a common leisure-time activity of many young students, a circumstance that shows their motivational, if not their educational, potential. In this paper we suggest that the design of videogames can be a very effective activity. To demonstrate this, we have used game design as a test-bed for an experience involving Computer Science and History students: interdisciplinary teams have cooperated in the design of a video-game on an historical theme. The experience has been repeated along three academic years. The students’ motivation has been evaluated in the last 2 years, demonstrating that it is higher when they use the interdisciplinary design of videogames as a way of learning instead of traditional learning methods.

User Modeling and Adaptation for Daily Routines is now published

User Modeling and Adaptation for Daily Routines
Providing Assistance to People with Special Needs

Editors: Estefanía Martín, Pablo A. Haya, Rosa M. Carro
ISBN: 978-1-4471-4777-0 (Print) 978-1-4471-4778-7 (Online)

User Modeling and Adaptation for Daily Routines

User Modeling and Adaptation for Daily Routines is motivated by the need to bring attention to how people with special needs can benefit from adaptive methods and techniques in their everyday lives. Assistive technologies, adaptive systems and context-aware applications are three well-established research fields. There is, in fact, a vast amount of literature that covers HCI-related issues in each area separately. However, the contributions in the intersection of these areas have been less visible, despite the fact that such synergies may have a great impact on improving daily living.

Presenting a comprehensive review of state-of-the-art practices on user modeling and adaptation for people with special needs, as well as some reflections on the challenges that need to be addressed in this direction, topics covered within this volume include the analysis, design, implementation and evaluation of adaptive systems to assist users with special needs to take decisions and fulfil daily routine activities. Particular emphasis is paid to major trends in user modeling, ubiquitous adaptive support, diagnostic and accessibility, recommender systems, social interaction, designing and building adaptive assistants for daily routines, field studies and automated evaluation.

Nine leading contributors write on key current research in the domain of adaptive applications for people with special needs, integrating and summarizing findings from the best known international research groups in these areas. User Modeling and Adaptation for Daily Routines highlights how adaptation technologies can ease daily living for all, and support sustainable high-quality healthcare, demographic ageing and social/economic inclusion.

Harnessing the Interaction Continuum for Subtle Assisted Living

Manuel García-Herranz, Fernando Olivera, Pablo Haya and Xavier Alamán

Sensors 2012 [download] (JCR, IF 2011: 1.953, Q1)

People interact with each other in many levels of attention, intention and meaning. This Interaction Continuum is used daily to deal with different contexts, adapting the interaction to communication needs and available resources. Nevertheless, computer-supported interaction has mainly focused on the most direct, explicit and intrusive types of human to human Interaction such as phone calls, emails, or video conferences. This paper presents the results of exploring and exploiting the potentials of undemanding interaction mechanisms, paying special attention to subtle communication and background interaction. As we argue the benefits of this type of interaction for people with special needs, we present a theoretical framework to define it and propose a proof of concept based on Augmented Objects and a color codification mechanism. Finally, we evaluate and analyze the strengths and limitations of such approach with people with cognitive disabilities.

The Conceptual Framing, Design and Evaluation of Device Ecologies for Collaborative Activities

Tim Coughlan,  Trevor D. Collins, Anne Adams, Yvonne Rogers, Pablo A. Haya, and Estefanía Martín

International Journal of Human-Computer Studies (2012) [download] (JCR, IF 2012: 1.415, Q2)

A variety of computing technologies, in addition to the personal computer, are now commonly used in many settings. As networking infrastructures mature, it is increasingly feasible and affordable to consider closer integration and use of these heterogeneous devices in tandem. However, little is known about how best to design or evaluate such ‘device ecologies’; in particular, how best to combine devices to achieve a desired type of collaborative user experience. A central concern is how users switch their attention between devices, to utilize the various elements to best effect. We describe here the development of an ecology of devices for groups of students to use when engaged in collaborative inquiry-learning activities. This included a multi-touch tabletop, laptops, projections, video streams and telephone. In situ studies of students and tutors using it in three different settings showed how individuals and groups switched their foci between the multiple devices. We present our findings, using a novel method for analysing users’ transitions between foci, identifying patterns and emergent characteristics. We then discuss the importance of designing for transitions that enable groups to appropriately utilise an ecology of devices, using the concepts of seams, bridges, niches and focal character.

Adaptive manuals as assistive technology to support and train people with acquired brain injury in their daily life activities

Javier Gómez, Germán Montoro, Pablo A. Haya, Xavier Alamán, Susana Alves and Mónica Martínez

Personal and Ubiquitous Computing 17 (6), 2013,  1117-1126 [download] (JCR, IF 2012: 1.133, Q2)

Assistive technologies and ubiquitous computing can be related since both try to help people in their lives. This common objective motivated us to develop and evaluate a system that puts ubiquitous computing technologies into the rehabilitation process of people with acquired brain injury. Thus, in this paper, we present and evaluate a system that shows adaptive manuals for daily-life activities for people with acquired brain injury. This first evaluation allowed us to validate our approach and also to extract valuable information about these systems as well as environmental factors that may affect the patients.

Volume 17 Issue 6, August 2013
Pages 1117-1126