Juxtalearn: learning science and computing through juxtaposition performance in video making

The main goals of JuxtaLearn are to research, develop and evaluate a pedagogical and technological framework that exploits performance to enhance science and technology learning. JuxtaLearn will encourage students to use creative activities, in particular video-making, to help them understand things they find difficult to grasp. The international project will apply to both university and school students

Juxtalearn PathwaySchool and University students studying science and technology often encounter barriers to their understanding of complex concepts. However, unlike in the arts, students are frequently poorly motivated to overcome these barriers. Focusing on ‘performance’ JuxtaLearn will provoke student curiosity in science and technology through
creative film making and editing activities. Computational identification of students’ barriers to conceptual understanding will be overcome by scaffolded creative application of concepts in activities juxtaposed to traditional understanding. State of the art technologies will support students transferable reflections focusing on two pedagogical approaches: juxtaposition performance and reflective performance.

The Conceptual Framing, Design and Evaluation of Device Ecologies for Collaborative Activities

Tim Coughlan,  Trevor D. Collins, Anne Adams, Yvonne Rogers, Pablo A. Haya, and Estefanía Martín

International Journal of Human-Computer Studies (2012) [download] (JCR, IF 2012: 1.415, Q2)

A variety of computing technologies, in addition to the personal computer, are now commonly used in many settings. As networking infrastructures mature, it is increasingly feasible and affordable to consider closer integration and use of these heterogeneous devices in tandem. However, little is known about how best to design or evaluate such ‘device ecologies’; in particular, how best to combine devices to achieve a desired type of collaborative user experience. A central concern is how users switch their attention between devices, to utilize the various elements to best effect. We describe here the development of an ecology of devices for groups of students to use when engaged in collaborative inquiry-learning activities. This included a multi-touch tabletop, laptops, projections, video streams and telephone. In situ studies of students and tutors using it in three different settings showed how individuals and groups switched their foci between the multiple devices. We present our findings, using a novel method for analysing users’ transitions between foci, identifying patterns and emergent characteristics. We then discuss the importance of designing for transitions that enable groups to appropriately utilise an ecology of devices, using the concepts of seams, bridges, niches and focal character.